Saturday, January 14, 2017

Episode 95 - Flickers '95

Happy New Year, and welcome back to the damp confines of the cave!  We are going into the wayback machine to remember a film series that made a major mark on genre cinema. We start off with the very entertaining "Airport" from 1970. With a stellar cast lead by Burt Lancaster, Dean Martin, Helen Hayes ( in an Oscar-winning role ) and series-regular George Kennedy, the film is based on the bestselling novel by Arthur Hailey.  It tells the story of an airport manager who is beset on every side, by nature, business forces, and a very dissatisfied wife. It is a tightly plotted, and swiftly paced tale. This is old-hollywood at it's best.  We follow that up with the second sequel, titled simply "Airport '77". This film boasts another amazing cast that includes Jack Lemmon, Lee Grant, Jimmy Stewart and even the legendary Joseph Cotton. It is more of an action-movie than the first film, but it is extremely entertaining and totally worth your time.  Let us know what you thought of the show by writing to flickersfrom@yahoo.com or flickersfrom@gmail.com or just leave a message on our Facebook page.


Sunday, December 25, 2016

Episode 94 - The Long Good Friends of Eddie Coyle

Happy Holidays from the Cave! Nothing says  "We Love You" more than a couple of vicious and depressing tales of crime and criminals. We start off with 1973's The Friends of Eddie Coyle, starring show-favorite Robert Mitchum  as Eddie "Fingers" Coyle who has made some bad choices and is finding himself running out of options. It is complicated and challenging and totally engrossing. We follow that up with 1980's The Long Good Friday which stars Bob Hoskins as Harold, a high-level British gangster who has lots of bad things happening in his life. It is similarly complicated and challenging and an excellent companion to Eddie Coyle. Let us know what you thought of the show by sending email to flickersfrom@gmail.com or flickersfrom@yahoo.com or leave a message on our Facebook page.

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Episode 93 - Last Exit to Fear

We look at two films based on work by the writer Huber Selby Jr. on this episode of the podcast. We  had only seen the amazing 2000 film Requiem for a Dream, which is based on Selby's book, so our expectations were high as we sought out his other films.  We start off the podcast with the 1989 film Last Exit to Brooklyn, which is based on Selby's controversial novel and which caused a big stir when it was released. With a strong lead performance from Stephen Lang, it is a complicated and impressive journey through a dark few weeks in the 50's. We follow that up with 2003's Fear X, from show-favorite Nicolas Winding Refn. With a stunningly underplayed performance from John Turturro, it focuses on a man who's experienced a senseless tragedy and his struggle to understand why it happened. Very low-key, moody, and tense, this is a film that will put you on edge almost immediately and then keep you there until the final credits.  Let us know what you thought of the show by writing to flickersfrom@gmail.com or flickersfrom@yahoo.com, or just leave a message on our Facebook page.


Sunday, October 30, 2016

Episode 92 - Flickers from the Polls

We get super-political on this episode of the podcast, just in time for the U.S. elections which are almost upon us. We start off with 1970's "Joe", an early film from John G. Avildsen who would later give us such box office champs as Rocky and the Karate Kid.  It takes a look at the relationship between the haves and have-nots at a time when the youth were not interested in following in their father's footsteps ( which is surely a thing of the past ).  We follow that up with 1957's "A Face In The Crowd" from the legendary Elia Kazan, and  starring our local hero Andy Griffith as Lonesome Rhodes. The screenplay is by Budd Schulberg, who teamed with Kazan for "On the Waterfront", for which he was awarded the Oscar for best screenplay.  This tells a very familiar tale of someone who is "famous for being famous" who rises to surprising power because the public loves his persona, and how that power can be used for less-than-ideal purposes.  Let us know what you think of the movies, and the podcast, by writing to flickersfrom@yahoo.com or flickersfrom@gmail.com or just leave us a message on our Facebook page.

Sunday, October 16, 2016

Episode 91 - Flickers from the Damp

We added an entirely new ( and probably unwanted ) feature to Flickers...VIDEO!  If you want to see us recording the second half of the show, click here.  We are back to the deep dark sea on this episode, focusing on two older movies that take place above, on and under the waves.  We start off with 1966's Destination Inner Space. Full of cheese and an almost Donald-Trump-Level of of gender politics, it is a fun piece of fluff with a VERY impressive monster.  We follow that up with a TV-movie from 1981 called The Intruder Within. Starring Chad Everett and Joseph Bottoms, it is a reworking of the story from Alien ( which was a reworking of It! The Terror From Beyond Space and Planet of the Vampires ) but done very competently with some great bits of character development and some nice original touches.  Listen in to hear us go into exhaustive ( and exhausting ) detail on each. Let us know what you thought of the show, and especially the video component by writing to flickersfrom@yahoo.com or flickersfrom@gmail.com or post a message on our Facebook page.
 

Saturday, September 17, 2016

Episode 90 - You're Going to Need a Bigger Podcast

Watch out, the cave is flooded and we have been beset by man-eating sharks!  We go back to the 70's for two films that took our eternal fascination with these fearsome beasts and try to use that to bring people to the cinemas.  We start off with 1975's "Shark's Treasure", which stars the legendary Cornel Wilde who also produced, wrote and directed the film.  Essentially a little  tale  of treasure-hunting adventure in the caribbean, this film packs in a huge amount of subtle, and subversive content. This is a great movie that is filled with surprising turns.  We follow that up with 1976's "Mako, The Jaws of Death" from genre filmmaker William GrefĂ©, and starring one of our favorite actors, Richard Jaeckel. It tells a story of a man who has become an ally with sharks and who fights against the humans that are out to exploit and kill them. It is a fun exploitation film with a strong performance from Jaeckel and some truly stunning scenes of shark attacks.  We loved both these films and would love to hear what your favorite shark movies are. Please write to us at flickersfrom@yahoo.com or flickersfrom@gmail.com, or you can just post a message on our Facebook page.
 

Sunday, September 4, 2016

Episode 89 - No Djacket Required

We go back to Italy for another dose of fine Italian cinema, this time focusing on two of their many "Spaghetti Westerns".  We start off with a Django film with surprisingly-low amounts of Django in it ( we figured it had, roughly, zero percent of Django in the actual film ) but...it was still totally awesome.  We are talking about the oddly-titled "Django Kill...if you Live, Shoot" from 1967. This is a weird and  twisted film that you really should search out. It has a wonderfully-complicated plot and a seemingly-endless stream of bizarre characters. All of whom are focused on screwing each other over. We follow that up with the absolutely brilliant "Keoma" from 1976 which stars the legendary Franco Nero ( the original Django ) as a half-breed indian who returns to his childhood home and must settle ALL the scores and right ALL the wrongs. It is amazing and impressive on almost every level.  Listen to the podcast to find out which level we feel doesn't quite measure up to the rest. Please let us know what you think of the show and send us suggestions for films to cover by writing to flickersfrom@gmail.com or flickersfrom@yahoo.com or just leave us a message on our Facebook page.